New York Labor And Employment Law Report

New York Labor And Employment Law Report

Tag Archives: USCIS

A New Year, A New Form I-9

Posted in Immigration
On November 14, 2016, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) released a new Form I-9 (Rev. 11/14/2016 N) to replace the prior form which expired on March 31, 2016.  Beginning January 22, 2017, employers must use this updated form for the initial employment verification of all new hires, as well as any applicable employment… Continue Reading

USCIS Increases Filing Fees Effective December 23, 2016

Posted in Immigration
For the first time since November 2010, the filing fees for many of the petitions and applications filed with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will increase, effective December 23, 2016.  All applications or petitions mailed, postmarked, or otherwise filed with USCIS on or after that date must include the new fee.… Continue Reading

H-1B Petition Filings for Fiscal Year 2015 Exceed Number of H-1B Visas Available

Posted in Immigration
As expected, on Monday, April 7, 2014, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) announced that a sufficient number of H-1B petitions had been received from April 1, 2014, through April 7, 2014, to meet the statutory cap for fiscal year 2015.  The statutory cap was reached in both the general Bachelor’s category, as well… Continue Reading

Employers Have Until November 5 to Create E-Verify Cases for Employees Affected by the Federal Government Shutdown

Posted in Immigration
After a brief hiatus prompted by the Federal Government shutdown, employers regained access to and use of the federal E-Verify system on October 17, 2013.  E-Verify is an Internet-based employment eligibility verification system administered by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”).  The E-Verify system does not serve as a replacement for the I-9 employment verification… Continue Reading

2010 H-1 B Visa Filing Alert

Posted in Immigration
U.S. employers continue to rely upon the H-1 B Specialty Occupation Worker category to facilitate the temporary employment of foreign nationals in professional positions. Pursuant to federal regulations, interested U.S. employers may file H-1 B petitions six months in advance of the start of the fiscal year. This means that the earliest that a U.S. employer may submit a petition for a new H-1B worker, who has not already been counted against the H-1B cap, is April 1, 2010.… Continue Reading